The Science of Time Travel

magicalnaturetour:

Praying Mantis Rides Snail Through Borneo Jungle. (Photos by Nordin Seruyan/Barcroft Media)

portalgifs:

portalgifs:

Probably my favorite part of the ending to portal 2 was this shot right here. For the entirety of Portal and Portal 2 you were always confined within the blank chambers of Aperture Science, even at the beginning the second game, when you walked through the ruins of Aperture Science, taken over by plant life, it was obvious that you were still trapped. The entire time through both games you were also never alone, you were certainly supposed to feel isolated, but you were never by yourself. If it wasn’t the voice of GLaDOS dictating your decisions, it was Wheatley, even at the beginning of the game when you first woke up the voice of the system AI provided continuous information whenever Wheatley wasn’t around to fill the silence. 
Then suddenly after the Elevator ride the door opens and you see an open field. For the first time in either games you are completely out of the confines of Aperture Science. Valve gave Chell; a protagonist who does not speak once for the entirety of either game, an amazing ability to make you understand what she is motivated by. The entire time your actions are intended to defy and escape Aperture, and a final shot of her being alone in a field is possibly the best payoff I could have asked for from a sequel because, for the first time, Chell has direct control over her life.

After obsessively looking through everybody’s reblog tags and comments I realized I didn’t address something. At this point I’m just making assumptions and conjectures so disregard anything if you don’t agree with it. That said, I think the reason Valve made it so obvious that Chell was alone in this moment was to signify the end of the player’s involvement in her life. Throughout every single Valve game your involvement with the protagonist goes along an intentionally linear path, forcing you to make choices for the character that shape the story, while keeping it obvious that the character you play made those decisions along with you, effectively creating a personality through the actions of the protagonist. At a point like this, where Chell is truly alone and without any obvious direction, it is logical to assume that when Chell left Aperture, her life choices could be whatever she wanted them to be, in contrast to when we controlled Chell and her choices were canonically made out of the need to survive, not out of free will. 
The most obvious previous example I can make of this is Barney Calhoun from Half-Life:Blue Shift and Half-life 2. In Blue Shift, Barney’s decisions are also made out of necessity to survive. And the ending was equally liberating for the protagonist, with Barney(spoilers) driving off into the desert with several scientists in a Black Mesa car. This being the equivalent of the wheat field in Portal 2. To show what we could expect from a future game for Chell, (assuming Valve didn’t surprise everybody with a curve ball like co-op between Gordon and Chell), I point to Barney’s role as a free-willed side-character in Half-Life: 2 and episode 1. 

portalgifs:

portalgifs:

Probably my favorite part of the ending to portal 2 was this shot right here. For the entirety of Portal and Portal 2 you were always confined within the blank chambers of Aperture Science, even at the beginning the second game, when you walked through the ruins of Aperture Science, taken over by plant life, it was obvious that you were still trapped. The entire time through both games you were also never alone, you were certainly supposed to feel isolated, but you were never by yourself. If it wasn’t the voice of GLaDOS dictating your decisions, it was Wheatley, even at the beginning of the game when you first woke up the voice of the system AI provided continuous information whenever Wheatley wasn’t around to fill the silence. 

Then suddenly after the Elevator ride the door opens and you see an open field. For the first time in either games you are completely out of the confines of Aperture Science. Valve gave Chell; a protagonist who does not speak once for the entirety of either game, an amazing ability to make you understand what she is motivated by. The entire time your actions are intended to defy and escape Aperture, and a final shot of her being alone in a field is possibly the best payoff I could have asked for from a sequel because, for the first time, Chell has direct control over her life.

After obsessively looking through everybody’s reblog tags and comments I realized I didn’t address something. At this point I’m just making assumptions and conjectures so disregard anything if you don’t agree with it. That said, I think the reason Valve made it so obvious that Chell was alone in this moment was to signify the end of the player’s involvement in her life. Throughout every single Valve game your involvement with the protagonist goes along an intentionally linear path, forcing you to make choices for the character that shape the story, while keeping it obvious that the character you play made those decisions along with you, effectively creating a personality through the actions of the protagonist. At a point like this, where Chell is truly alone and without any obvious direction, it is logical to assume that when Chell left Aperture, her life choices could be whatever she wanted them to be, in contrast to when we controlled Chell and her choices were canonically made out of the need to survive, not out of free will. 

The most obvious previous example I can make of this is Barney Calhoun from Half-Life:Blue Shift and Half-life 2. In Blue Shift, Barney’s decisions are also made out of necessity to survive. And the ending was equally liberating for the protagonist, with Barney(spoilers) driving off into the desert with several scientists in a Black Mesa car. This being the equivalent of the wheat field in Portal 2. To show what we could expect from a future game for Chell, (assuming Valve didn’t surprise everybody with a curve ball like co-op between Gordon and Chell), I point to Barney’s role as a free-willed side-character in Half-Life: 2 and episode 1. 

mintchocotea:

boyfriendhook:

In which Jaime required coffee in order to sit through the wedding vows. [x]

OMFG BEST MISTAKE EVER

zeroyalviking:

mrcrockers:

mrcrockers:

hue jackman

image

i showed this to my sister and she slapped me

hueueueueue

syfycity:

Every time…

syfycity:

Every time…

renjin-chan:

is she using a vhs to try to clean that up

renjin-chan:

is she using a vhs to try to clean that up

vrisktorias-sekret:

all-good-usernames-are-taken:

WHAT A LITTLE SHIT

i lOVE HOW HE JUST HESITATES FOR A SECOND

THEN HE JUST

REBELLION”